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Accession number 2015.2
Call# E75 .N398 v.14(3) 2001
Summary "Native Peoples: Arts and Lifeways", Vol. 14 No. 3; March/April 2001

ON THE COVER

Clan/destine: Rockin' Rez Dawgs


In November 2000, Arizona-based Native band Clan/destine won their

first Native American Music Award in the "Best Pop/Rock Recording"

category for their second album, Deeply Rooted. Groovin' since 1995,

the six-member band performs all original music that combines rock,

reggae and Native American influences. By Patty Talahongva Hopi.

Photography by LeRoy DeJolie Navajo.

FEATURES

Spotlight on Native American Music


The boom of interest in Native American contemporary music garners a

new GRAMMY category, as well as the establishment of the Native

American Music Awards. Here, a look at how Native artists and promoters

are infiltrating every field of popular music, from rock, rap, country,

new-age and alter-Native. By j. poet.

Harvard University's Honoring Nations Program


Honoring Contributions in the Governance of American Indian Nations

(Honoring Nations) is a national awards program administered by the

Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. Now in its

second year, the program's mission is to identify, celebrate and share

outstanding examples of governance among Indian nations in the United

States. Discover how 16 finalists are improving the lives of their

citizens and building healthy futures. By Liz Hill Red Lake Band of

Ojibwe

Pathways: Machu Picchu


South America's most famous archaeological site, Machu Picchu remained

hidden from the outside world for centuries. Built on a narrow ridge

between canyon walls located in the Andes mountain range, this ancient

citadel is the finest surviving example of the late Imperial Inca style

of architecture, and now attracts a multinational crowd of up to 1,700

visitors a day during peak season. Here, how this UNESCO-designated

World Heritage Site must now balance preservation issues with

much-needed tourism revenues. Story and Photography by Amber Cook

Artist Profile: Anita Fields


Osage clay artist Anita Fields' first creations were made of mud and

stone and other items she found as a child living in the country near

Hominy, Oklahoma. Now widely recognized, Fields creates award-winning

works in clay that express feminine dignity and cultural reverence. By

Carolyn Gonzalez (Cherokee), photography by Tom Fields (Creek/Cherokee).

DEPARTMENTS

Letters
Readers respond to The Lost Child claiming ancestral heritage.

Viewpoint
Oneida

singer and Grammy Award nominee Joanne Shenandoah celebrates the

Iroquois tradition of song, honors her mentors, and gives voice to the

current explosion in Native music.





On The Wind


Bronitsky & Associates, an organization dedicated to bringing

Indigenous arts and performance to world audiences; Native artists

blaze a “Trail of Painted Ponies” for charity in Santa Fe. By Daniel

Gibson.





Happening


Hollywood, Native style: The eighth annual First Americans in the Arts

Awards honor Native American entertainment and media icons. Also,

Alabama’s Indian Dance Festival, and the Wichita Indian Art Market

& Exhibition. By Daniel Gibson.





Spirit of the Harvest


Peanuts and Sweet Potatoes. Four recipes borrowed from the combined

cooking traditions of the Europeans, Africans, and the Five

Tribes—Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek and Seminole—of the

Southeast. By Beverly Cox and Martin Jacobs.





Focus on Education


Sage Wisdom: Learning from Our Elders. Childcare centers and tribal

colleges bridge generations and culture through elder mentor programs.

By Suzette Brewer (Cherokee).





Pathways: Machu Picchu


South America’s most famous archaeological site, Machu Picchu remained

hidden from the outside world for centuries. Built on a narrow ridge

between canyon walls located in the Andes mountain range, this ancient

citadel is the finest surviving example of the late Imperial Inca style

of architecture, and now attracts a multinational crowd of up to 1,700

visitors a day during peak season. Here, how this UNESCO-designated

World Heritage Site must now balance preservation issues with

much-needed tourism revenues. Story and photos by Amber Cook.





Galleries


The American Indian Community House Gallery in New York City.

Established in 1977, this Indian-owned and -operated gallery continues

to offer compelling exhibitions of contemporary Native art. By T. R.

Tall Chief (Osage).





Music


Powwow singer Edmund Bull’s first solo release, Indian Boy, fuses

traditional Cree melodies with Hank Williams–inspired country music.

Also, Gathering: Native Alaskan Music and Words, and Shadowyze’s Spirit

Warrior. By j poet.





Book Reviews


Honor the Grandmothers: Dakota and Lakota Women Tell Their Stories chronicles four remarkable elders and their messages to present and future generations. Also, The Sketchbook of Thomas Blue Eagle, a fictional narrative that traces the adventures of an eighteen-year-old Sioux during the late 19th century. By Alan Tack.





Film & Video


On & Off the Res’ with Charlie Hill

pays tribute to comedian Charlie Hill (Oneida), whose politically

charged material protests historical absurdities and challenges

stereotypes. Naturally Native

follows the victories of three sisters as they strive to establish a

business and connect with their tribal identity. By David Claudio

Iglesias (Kuna).




Object Name journal
Title Native Peoples: Arts and Lifeways, Vol. 14 No. 3; March/April 2001
Published Date March/April 2001
Physical Description 8 x 11 inch softcover, 64 pp.; color images
Catalog Number 2015.2.605
Imagefile 094\20152605.JPG
LCNO E75 .N398 v.14(3) 2001
Published Place Phoenix
Publisher Native Peoples